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Buy or Rent the GoPro HERO6

Stop by our GoPro display in Production Outfitters! We are selling (and renting) the all new GoPro HERO6 camera. 

Retailing for $499.99, the HERO6 Black is compatible with all GoPro mounting accessories.

This new addition to the GoPro family boasts real image stabilization and an all new GP1 processor. The Hero6 is capable of 240fps at 1080p image quality or 4k up to 60fps making it ideal for slow-mo action. Click here to watch #GoProHERO6 action. 

Contact us for more details: answers@rule.com or 800-rule-com.

–Haley Parizo, Sales Operations Manager

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Quasar LED Lighting Tools to Rent or Buy

Quasar: one of over a thousand known extragalactic objects, starlike in appearance and having spectra with characteristically large redshifts, that are thought to be the most distant and most luminous objects in the universe.

Unfortunately, we don’t have “the most luminous objects in the universe” in our inventory but we do have a fleet of Quasar Science products available to rent and buy. Quasar offers a wide variety of LED lighting tools and many of them can be found right here at Rule Boston Camera.

Low profile, self ballasted, dimmer compatible, energy efficient, 95+ CRI, flicker free, 25,000 hour lifetime, and much more are just a few of the many features in the Quasar line-up of products.

We encourage you to stop by the shop, and check out these lights for yourself. We’ve got a bunch of new fixtures on the horizon for both rentals and sales in addition to what’s already in our rental inventory (Crossfade LED Kit, Kino Quasar 4ft/4 Bank Fixture) and in our Production Outfitters Expendables Store.

Another resource is our IN THE SHOWROOM video on the A-LED and Q-LED Crossfade lighting tools. Click here to watch, and reach out with questions.

Dylan Law, QC/Logistics & MoVI Tech

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The Angenieux EZ-1: Affordable and Flexible Cine Zoom

The Angenieux EZ-1 30-90mm T2 Super35 zoom lens is one of a handful of lenses in the quickly expanding category of affordable cine-zooms. For a long time, cinema zooms were always two things: heavy and expensive. In the past year or so, we have seen manufacturers innovate and release a new group of lightweight cinema zooms. To name a few: Zeiss 21-100mm, Sigma 18-35mm / 50-100mm, Fujinon 18-55mm, and Canon 18-80mm. As a documentary and commercial shooter, it has been great to see this huge increase in choices at a reasonable price. I find myself taking the Angenieux on set because of its size, its flexibility, and its wide open performance.

First and foremost, the size, weight, and handling of this lens is superb. It is well-balanced and weighs in at just 4lbs. I shoot a lot of handheld and gimbal work so weight is always a factor. Having built-in focus, iris, and zoom gears is a big advantage in both keeping the lens streamlined and removing any extra weight from add-on 3rd party focus gears. The EZ-1 also features rubberized grips along the lens for better control when not using a follow focus. This lens is built with the operator in mind.

In the documentary world, staying flexible on set is a must. The ability to quickly go from PL to EF to E mount on set with no tools is a big deal. Pairing lenses and sensors is a big part of a cinematographer’s job these days — both from an aesthetics standpoint and a function standpoint. This lens is equally at home on a Sony a7S wedged inside a car as it is on a 35mm ARRI film camera on a dolly. In addition to the lens mount, you can also change the rear optical block to go from covering just Super35 to covering full frame/ VistaVision. 

There is a certain feeling imbued into lenses by each manufacturer. A subtle difference that doesn’t come across in technical specifications but is often talked about amongst cinematographers and is unique to that manufacturer. Angenieux’s reputation is one of the best in the industry. The EZ-1 fits in easily amongst its family members and delivers the same consistent colors and pleasing sharpness that one should expect from Angenieux.  

-Harvey Burrell, Guest Blogger and Co-founder of Windy Films

 

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ARRI Announces New Lightweight Matte Box LMB-4×5

At long last ARRI weds the popular LMB-25 with the studio functionality of the MB-19 in the new LMB 4×5. 

No longer must we double up on studio and lightweight boxes on the same job as the 4×5 can fill both roles.   

The swing away and tilt module is my favorite new option!  

Click here to watch ARRI’s cool CGI video that visually explains the whole system:

Adam Van Voorhis, Equipment Manager,

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Now Taking Pre-Orders – Buy the Freefly MoVI Pro at Rule Boston Camera

We’re now taking pre-orders for the latest in Freefly’s line of camera movement systems. Introducing the new MōVi Pro — their most powerful, versatile, smart and reliable digital handheld stabilizer yet!

freefly-movi-pro-handheld-bundle-p4167-6568_image

Freefly plans to start shipping mid-November. Each MōVi Pro system will include the MōVi Pro, the MIMIC, 2x MōVi Pro battery packs & more to get you started right out of the box! To place your pre-order with a $200 deposit (non-refundable, but transferrable), contact Michael Kalish at sales@rule.com or 800-rule-com. Be sure to watch the intro video at https://vimeo.com/188601738. And click here for the MōVi Pro sales price, description, specs and features.

Interested in trying before buying? The MōVi Pro is coming soon to Rentals. Click here for rental rate and details or contact rentals at answers@rule.com or 800-rule.com

RBC’s Dylan Law flew to Freefly HQ in Washington for their MōVi Pro launch party. Stay tuned for his upcoming blog post with all the technical and creative details.

-Haley Parizo, Sales Operations Manager, parizo@rule.com

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The New AKIRA Firmware Update for the MōVI

Everyone loves a good firmware update and Freefly Systems did not disappoint with the newest Akira update. New features and incredible improvements make up the newest download. The MōVI camera stabilization system has already offered up amazing opportunities for filmmakers, and the gifts keep coming.

Movi-Firmware-Akira

 

HiPER STABILIZATION: This new feature (more of an improvement) is the shinning star of Akira, in my opinion. Stabilization performance of the MōVI has increased, resulting in images that are much more stable and stronger overall. Longer lenses, focus, iris, and zoom setups can now be achieved more easily with incredible results.

TIMELAPSE MODE: The possibilities seem endless when working with the MōVI and now, with Timelapse Mode, yet another door has opened. Creating your time-lapse moves with this new software is literally a dream come true, so GO OUT AND MAKE NEW IMAGES!

TARGET MODE: GPS position locking and follow mode! Oh, this is getting fun now! When working with the MIMIC, transmitter operators and DP’s can introduce a “chase cam” look — seamlessly.

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Improvements all around and new added features make up the Akira update. I didn’t even mention the new user interface for the mobile applications. Oh, and there are even more goodies to be found. Ok, enough reading! It’s time to put Akira to the test.

We sell and rent a variety of Freefly motion tools. Please contact us at answers@rule.com or 800-rule-com (800-785-3266) for more information.

Dylan Law, QC/Logistics & MōVI Tech, law@rule.com

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The Sony PXW-Z150

  Sony_PXW-Z150 There’s a lot to be said for a good camcorder-styled camera — a format that, in recent years, hasn’t been given the love and attention I feel it deserves. While not the most exciting camera, more often than not (and especially for event and corporate shooters) — it is by far the most practical. The market was given a glimpse of the future late last year, with Panasonic’s release of the DVX 200. The camera provided a Micro Four Thirds imager, with a camcorder-styled body and attached zoom lens. The idea being that run-and-gun shooters needn’t compromise on depth of field any longer. By using the larger sensor, shooters could finally get images that rivaled those of their DSLR counterparts in the sub-$5,000 market. It’s a need that won’t be going away any time soon, either — producers and content creators have come to enjoy the shallow depth of field “look” that one gets from large imagers (the Canon 5D Mark II is probably to blame). But, rigging these small cameras with external recorders, audio interfaces, shoulder mounts, top handles, and shotgun mics was never the end-all, be-all answer shooters needed (although the DVX 200 delivered on these issues). Enter the Sony PXW-Z150, Sony’s newest offering in the PXW line, sitting happily alongside the popular FS5. At a little over three grand, this camera packs a punch. Its imager is slightly smaller than that of the DVX 200, but compared to the ⅓” and even ⅔” sensors of the prior generation of camcorders, the Z150’s 1” sensor adds just enough depth-of-field options to feel very versatile.   z150-medium In addition to its sensor, the Z150 has a few more tricks up its sleeve to bring it in line with its fancier, smaller counterparts. Sony has built the foundation of the camera’s acquisition on the now tried-and-true XAVC-L codec. While it’s not as dense as the FS7’s XAVC-I, it’s a huge improvement from the price-comparative a7SII (XAVC-S). The Z150 records a UHD 4K image internally, using the same SDXC cards as the FS5. It also has the ability to overcrank to 120fps in HD formats. Slowmo seems to be the new battleground for this market, and it’s great to see that Sony has matched the challenge. Perhaps the most interesting feature, for a humble colorist to appreciate, is its ability to record 10 bit HD. Traditionally, any camera under $10,000 recorded 8 bit images internally. To see a camera like this recording a nice and dense 10 bit image is a huge improvement. This camera has far more in common with an FS7 than an EX1. After that, the features meet all the new standards easily — built-in ND filter, a powerful autofocus and full auto mode, and XLR inputs. Run-and-gun shooters will feel right at home with the familiar Sony layout, and even though they’ve simplified the menus — I don’t find myself wanting anything extra. A common criticism of Sony’s latest camera lines is how complicated their menu structures are, so to see things paired down a bit in this camera is a welcome addition. It’s slightly disappointing that the Z150 doesn’t include any LOG gammas, but the normal picture profiles fill any creative gaps you may have. I don’t foresee many people shooting LOG on a camcorder, but with 10 bit, my question is ‘why not’? I would love to use the Z150 as a B camera to an FS7. Those are small potatoes, though, and I find myself very satisfied shooting with the Z150. For folks who are comfortable with the EX1 or NX cameras, this is, most likely, the 4K upgrade you’ve been waiting for. We are currently selling and renting the PXW-Z150, please contact us at answers@rule.com or 800-rule-com (800-785-3266) for more information! Alex Enman, Engineer, enman@rule.com

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Mixing Paint: The Phantom Flex4K

As with all of their products, Vision Research has created yet another high frame rate monster. Shooting RAW or ProRes, the Flex4K can crank all the way up to 938fps at true 4K — and almost 2,000fps in HD. With all that power under the hood, the question now becomes: What are we going to shoot?! It took us a while to come up with a subject that would do the camera justice. Eventually, we had it all planned out – we were going to see if mixing some paint with a huge speaker would produce some cool results. (It did.) First, we knew we needed light. Lots of light. The mid-day sun was our best bet, so we set up outside. To hold our subject, we set up a basic wooden platform, making sure to keep a wide enough base to catch any paint shrapnel. We hooked our speaker up to a receiver, and fed it various tones from an iPhone — apparently, yes, there is an app for this. With our stage set, we then turned to camera settings. We decided that shooting the true 4K image would be best – 4096 x 2304 at 938fps. If we had chosen a standard UHD 4K recording, we could have shot even faster. For paint, we went with a water based children’s finger paint – in hopes that maybe we could salvage the speaker, and our clothing. The water based paint would also mix better – a latex paint would mix slower, but may have looked cool as colors intertwined more. We’ll give that one a shot next time. We decided to shoot to the ProRes codec, rather than RAW, once we saw the image the camera gave in the standard rec709 color space. The final video color has not been graded in any way, all the footage is straight off the camera. While the RAW files are wonderful, and fantastic for grading – it can become somewhat burdensome with ever shrinking hard drive space. We found the colors to be awesome in the 709 gamma, and very reminiscent of ARRI. There is also the option for LOG. For glass, we chose the Angenieux 25-250, partly to keep our gear out of paint’s way – but also to take advantage of the beautiful lens compression you get on the long end. The focal plane wasn’t too shallow at T4, but the added compression at 100mm and above really brought the image alive. After the shoot, I loaded the ProRes files into Premiere, and we were exporting soon thereafter. For such a high data rate, specialized camera, the workflow all around was relatively simple. Watch the final results: https://vimeo.com/158513325   The Phantom Flex4K is available to rent here at Rule – come check it out! -Alex Enman, Engineer, enman@rule.com

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Lighting Planes, Trains, and Automobiles? I Have Just the Light For You!

This is literally the most flexible light in the world of entertainment lighting! The Bi-Color Flexlite, released in April of this year by Aladdin USA, is a light everyone should be using on every shoot. When I say “literally” I mean the fixture can actually bend to fit the contour of a column or the ceiling of a car. The Bi-Color Flexlite is so light and malleable that you can tape it to a column or to the ceiling of a car without any other type of support. Crazy, right? But “literally” true. Need the light to be daylight balanced to boost the ambient daylight from the windshield of a car? No problem. Switching color temperature is a breeze with the turn of a dial! Use gaffers tape to tape the unit to the ceiling of a car or the inside of a windshield. And don’t worry about power availability — you can run it off a battery. As an LED, it will run for an hour on a 90wh battery or 2 hours on a 180Wh battery. The “flexibility” doesn’t stop there…the accessories available for this fixture can support any situation. Do you need a lightweight lantern in a limited power situation? Just strap on gold mounted batteries and set it up with the custom-built lantern. The lantern just pops open into shape when you remove it from the bag -– it can be set up in a matter of seconds. Don’t have a c-stand or maffer clamp? Hang the Bi-Color Flexlite in its lantern anywhere. The kit comes with a dual magnet mount so it can be mounted onto any metal surface. The kit is full of useful accessories in addition to the dual magnet mount. Included is a baby pin adapter to set it up directly on a stand. Additionally, there is a soft box with no support rods or speed rings – the soft box just affixes via Velcro directly to the back of the light. The front diffusion piece sits approximately 4″ above the Bi-Color Flexlite panel. This creates a beautiful, soft light. Have you been concerned about the green shift in LED lighting? Well, not any more! This light reads  like a dream on the CRI with even, white light – no valleys and no peaks. Check out this photometrics chart from the Aladdin website:

Aladin Bi Flex 50W
60cm/2ft 1m/3ft 2m/6ft 3m/9ft CRI
Daylight  6000K 4200lux 1600lux 450lux 210lux 98
BiColor    4200K 4600lux 1700lux 500lux 230lux 97
Tungsten 3000K 3400lux 1200lux 340lux 170lux 97

But wait, there’s more… I just can’t say enough great things about this fixture. The Bi-Color Flexlite is splash and rainproof too – they have conducted tests submerging the fixture in pools and an aquarium. BUT, do be careful, as the dimmer and power unit are not splash/rainproof and will need to be protected. This light can be used in so many different ways that I wouldn’t want to be on set without at least one of these. Thank you for reading, and, as always, do not hesitate to call me with any questions at 617-277-2200 (or 800-rule-com), or email me HighOutput@rule.com. I look forward to seeing all of you at my next Showroom Demo on Wednesday, September 30th from 12 to 1pm. RSVP: HighOutputEvents@Rule.com. -Alison Cupples, Lighting Specialist, HighOutput@Rule.com

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An Introduction to the Sony PXW-FS7

As with all my blog posts, I’m happy to introduce you to yet another camera that’s being called “The Next Big Thing!” I’ve talked at length about the Panasonic GH4, the Sony a7s, and other it cameras that seemed to stir up buzz this past year. 2014 was a great year for new technology to find its way to lower price point cameras, and the culmination of that may be the new Sony FS7. The FS7 was touted as being designed by Sony from “listening,” and I can’t argue with that. Professionals have been asking for an ergonomic, easy to use, high frame rate, 4K camera with built-in ND filters and all the bells and whistles one would come to expect from a professional camera. A large chip, easily adaptable mount – and a high quality internal codec. This list seems long and perhaps unattainable for a sub $10K camera, but all of those features have been delivered and met in the FS7. First and foremost, some specs. The Sony FS7 has a s35 sized sensor, that seems to be almost identical to that of the Sony F5. In my book, this may be the best selling point of the camera. With this sensor, the FS7 is able to not only record UHD 4k to 2 different flavors of XAVC, but it can also shoot up to 180fps in HD. For low light, the sensor has a base ISO of 2000 – with some built-in ND filters to help you out. Standard XLR inputs, and even a nice arri style rosette for the very comfortable and easy to use side handle. This camera will most be compared to the wildly successful Canon C300 – but truth be told, the FS7’s got it beat in features. SLOG3 is available, as well as the highly gradable and precise Cine EI mode. This camera fits in line much closer to the F55 and F5 than it’s namesake, the FS700. Unlike the FS700, the FS7 does not have a 3G SDI output on its standard body. Instead, a rear add-on unit is required to pass RAW out to something like the Odyssey 7Q. While this is sort of a bummer, the rear RAW unit also provides the ability to record ProRes directly to the cards internally – though XAVC is a very high bitrate codec itself. After using the FS7 for a few weeks, all I can really say is that it more or less works as advertised. All the promises Sony made are delivered, and the camera works great. It’s comfortable, but could stand to use an additional shoulder pad to add some comfort. The battery times are very long, and the buttons on the camera are familiar and easy to find. The big credit most users gave to the Canon C300 was it’s ease of use, and good image. The FS7 meets that, and goes beyond. High frame rates are going to be the next big camera battleground in the next 5 years, and Canon’s 60FPS at 720p isn’t holding a candle to the FS7’s 60FPS at 4k, or 180FPS in HD. I’ve run into a few small issues when adapting Canon lenses with the metabones speed boosters and smart adapters – but they are usable. Metabones released a firmware update for the speed booster ultra that seems to have helped it out – though operation still seems sluggish. These are nitpicking details, however. If you’re curious about image quality, you can find plenty of beautiful examples all over the net as the camera is finding it’s way to shooters. And keep in mind, the image quality will be near identical to the Sony F5! Here’s a really great video from vimeo user Joe Simon Films showcasing some of the FS7 abilities. https://vimeo.com/112027631 And here is a beautiful spot shot on the F5 from vimeo user Overseasfilms.com – pretty amazing that this image can now be captured by a camera that costs around 8 grand! https://vimeo.com/85711136 Check out this review from Anticipate Media: http://vimeo.com/anticipatemedia/review/113330848/9d76c28504. We have the FS7 here at Rule to buy or rent, so be sure to come check it out. -Alex Enman, Engineer, enman@rule.com