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The Concept of Ease in Filmmaking

In the place I am now, having recently graduated, looking/hoping/begging for work, and getting this internship and blog to learn from and play with, I feel privileged and prepared to go ahead and share a very quick reflection on a concept that I, and I’m sure countless others, have faithfully explored, willingly embraced, and so readily attempted to reject: ease. What follows are just some thoughts and ruminations, from an RBC intern, on the concept of ease in filmmaking. As I think and I ruminate, I am inspired by one of the coolest pieces of equipment I’ve been introduced to at Rule, the Kessler CineDrive: an amazing genius robot helper for all your pans, tilts, slides and more. Coming from a class of filmmakers rightfully obsessed with finding unique, professional, and visually stunning ways to capture the simplest and most complex of modern moments, the possibilities here, the ease with which we can achieve them, and the overall potential that the CineDrive represents are enormous! I’ve also been inspired by another one of the coolest pieces of equipment I’ve been presented with at Rule, the Arri 416 HS Plus 16mm film camera. It’s beautiful. I’ve gotten to experiment with 16mm film just one other very brief time in my life, and because of cameras like this, it sucks to think that the slowly dying “film” in “film school” could soon breathe it’s last breath. I’m very thankful that there are places that still have the resources to teach about film and encourage it to be used.  I don’t mean to say that shooting on film is at the other end of a spectrum, or that it’s necessarily hard, but it is kind of painstaking!  It’s also really different from what I and my generation has gotten used to. On shoots that I’ve been on and helped with, I always find myself wishing things could be a little easier, move faster, or become magically convenient. Hopefully, I’m not alone in this, but then I look at the crazy cardboard/tape/black wrap/diffusion thing in front of me and realize that ease is awesome, but so is hard work. The experience that has made me seriously crave the endless touch-ups and touchiest set-ups of each and every film set has been this internship. Knowing and learning about the tools to achieve ease, perfection — or dare I say both — has proven invaluable, making me that much more passionate about making movies. It’s also been really wonderful to be exposed to an evolution of filmmaking though RBC, because when I’m around people whose job it is to know the ins and outs of decades of equipment, it becomes fascinating to compare a modern marvel like the CineDrive, if it could be representative of the ease a filmmaker might, deep down, die for, to something like a 16mm film camera, if it could be representative of the perpetual fragility and exhaustion of filmmaking, as well as the amazing reward that results. Cat Haag, Summer 2014 Intern, intern@rule.com

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In the Showroom: Sony EX1R & EX3 Savings!

With the recent influx of large sensor cameras with detachable lenses like Sony’s PMW-F3 and Panasonic’s AF-100, many people are wondering what the future holds for their PMW-EX1R or PMW-EX3 — both of which are only a few years old and still going strong.  Sony made adjustments around the new trend by offering a $300 rebate on the EX1R and a $500 rebate on the EX3 with great leasing options.  This isn’t meant to dwindle the EX inventory, however, and it’s not because the EX series is going out of style, but it’s meant to highlight the fact that both are still phenomenal cameras with great features.  In our Sales Showroom, we’ve seen lots of EX sales activity, and this special rebate offer from Sony is a great opportunity for savings. You won’t see a comparable camera like this from Sony anytime soon. Here’s a quick overview of some capabilities of the EX1R/EX3: 1/2″ sensor 1080p 24p HD-SDI 8-pin remote connection 2/3″ Lens Capability (EX3 Only) 2 XLR inputs Interchangeable Lens System (EX3 only) Dual SxS Express Card Slot 1/33 – 1/2000 shutter speed range Stop by the Showroom for more details. Michelle Brooks, Inside Sales Representative

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Expendables for Students at Production Outfitters!

As the school year approaches, the Production Outfitters store here at Rule Boston Camera is gearing up for the influx of new and returning students! With a wide inventory of expendables such as light meters, American Cinematographer Manuals, and many different technical books on Video, Audio, and Film, students will receive a discount on all light meters with a special discount on autographed copies of David E. Elkins, book, “The Camera Assistant’s Manual” during his Learning Lab “Nuts & Bolts of the AC Position” held on Wednesday, August 25th from 10am to 12n. Visit the Production Outfitters store for all the essential items a student needs to round out their film classes! Gen Andrews, Production Outfitters Store

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Canon 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM lens review

I have owned the 100mm Macro IS for approximately a month now and have used it mostly for nature video and still work. Although this lens is labeled and intended for Macro work it is a fully functional 100mm lens for telephoto use as well. The lens features Canon’s new Hybrid image stabilization which provides 4stops of stabilization correction which allows for hand held work were normally only a tripod would do. The lens is an L series but unlike most is made of a durable black plastic instead of a metal body. Do not let this fool you as the lens is very durable and I think it might be used on future lenses because of its weight, thermal properties, and for cost. The lens still features a weather sealed ring to mate up with your 5DMKII, 1DMKIV, or 7D. Another great feature of this lens is that it has life-size close-up capabilities, something that would require the life-size adapter in the past with other macro lenses. The fast 2.8 aperture is great for documentary work and in the field where bringing in additional light may not be an option. The aperture features 9 blades in a circular pattern that provides a consistent bokeh. The lens features a three position focus limiter to allow for quick AF if you are not in manual mode. Reducing the range of focus that the lens has to hunt for makes the USM work within a split second to achieve subject focus, which can save your shot. I sometimes find myself using this feature and once I am within range switching over to manual focus. A great feature of this macro lens is adding the 2x extender which then gives you 200mm but retains the minimum focus distance. I used this last weekend to shoot macro footage of a Praying Mantis eating an aphid for a project I am working on. I knew I needed to be within 8 inches of the subject to achieve the framing I wanted but the 2x extender made it happen without sacrifice. Because the lens is fast at 2.8 the lose of a stop was still well within the perimeters of the light that was available. For video use the 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM is well matched in color and consistency to the typical lenses used. I found it matched nicely with the 16-35, 24-70, 70-200. Some post correction was required when inter-cutting with the 85mm 1.2, and the 600mm but overall it was minimal. This is a still taken with the 100mm f/2.8L Maco IS USM lens at Lake Fairlee Vermont dusk, wide open 2.8 ISO 200 from a deck approx 100meters from the waters edge. Using the lens as a telephoto instead of a macro. 1″ Tree Frog taken with same lens but using it as a Macro instead of telephoto mode. Overall I think if you require a macro lens the 100mm f/2.8L IS USM is the route to go over the 50, 60, 65 and the 180. Canon only has two L series macros, the 100mm and the 180mm, but the 180mm is f/3.5, does not feature IS, requires a tripod and is much heavier than the 100mm. It is a great lens to have in your kit and I recommend you test one out when you have the chance as I have found myself using the lens as my standard 100mm tele for non-macro use. Michael Sutton Senior Account Manager Twitter: @MNS1974

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Arctic Butterfly® 724 Sensor Brush & Amp, BriteVue Sensor Loupe 7X

We had heard about this cleaning brush/loupe combo for CCD/CMOS sensors before.  So we eventually got it, and we’re glad we did.  I’m happy to report that it’s an excellent tool and it works great! We got the Arctic Butterfly® 724 (Super Bright) equipped with 2 super bright LEDs Sensor Brush & Visible Dust BriteVue Sensor Loupe 7X. First, you look at the sensor with lighted loupe, find the dust particles and clean the brush, rotating it (electric motor is built-in) while simultaneously charging the fibers (electrostatic charge).  You then swipe the sensor clean with it and confirm it’s condition with the loupe. Rotate the brush again to get rid of the dust.  Done. Zbigniew Twarog, Chief Engineer